Eikonal Blog

2011.09.30

awk

Filed under: scripting, unix — Tags: , — sandokan65 @ 11:03

Passing shell variables to AWK

Thing that works well for me:

    awk '{print "'"$VARIABLE"'"}' 1 > 2
    

Related here: Scripting languages – https://eikonal.wordpress.com/2010/06/15/awk-sed/ | Unix tricks – https://eikonal.wordpress.com/2011/02/15/unix-tricks/ | SED tricks – https://eikonal.wordpress.com/2010/10/05/sed-tricks/ | Memory of things disappearing > nmap stuff > getports.awk – https://eikonal.wordpress.com/2010/06/23/memory-of-things-disappearing-nmap-stuff-getports-awk/

2010.06.15

Scripting languages

Filed under: scripting, unix — Tags: , , , , , , — sandokan65 @ 14:35

Unix shells:

Windows Scripting:

Multi-language pages:

Compiling shell scripts

Can not be done.


Related here: Unix tricks – https://eikonal.wordpress.com/2011/02/15/unix-tricks/ | SED tricks – https://eikonal.wordpress.com/2010/10/05/sed-tricks/ | Memory of things disappearing > nmap stuff > getports.awk – https://eikonal.wordpress.com/2010/06/23/memory-of-things-disappearing-nmap-stuff-getports-awk/ | AWK – https://eikonal.wordpress.com/2011/09/30/awk/

2010.04.02

Regular expressions

Sites

Tools

Standalone tools:

Online testers:

Books

Tidbits

Sources: The above links.

  • [abc] – A single character: a, b or c
  • [^abc] – Any single character but a, b, or c
  • [a-z] – Any single character in the range a-z
  • [a-zA-Z] – Any single character in the range a-z or A-Z
  • ^ – Start of line
  • $ – End of line
  • \A – Start of string
  • \z – End of string
  • . – Any single character
  • \s – Any whitespace character
  • \S – Any non-whitespace character
  • \d – Any digit
  • \D – Any non-digit
  • \w – Any word character (letter, number, underscore)
  • \W – Any non-word character
  • \b – Any word boundary character
  • (…) – Capture everything enclosed
  • (a|b) – a or b
  • a? – Zero or one of a
  • a* – Zero or more of a
  • a+ – One or more of a
  • a{3} – Exactly 3 of a
  • a{3,} – 3 or more of a
  • a{3,6} – Between 3 and 6 of a
  • ^\s[ \t]*$ – Match a blank line
  • \d{2}-\d{5} – Validate an ID number consisting of 2 digits, a hyphen, and another 5 digits

Special common strings:

  • Personal Name: ^[\w\.\’]{2,}([\s][\w\.\’]{2,})+$
  • Username: ^[\w\d\_\.]{4,}$
  • Password at least 6 symbols: ^.{6,}$
  • Password or empty input: ^.{6,}$|^$
  • email: ^[\_]*([a-z0-9]+(\.|\_*)?)+@([a-z][a-z0-9\-]+(\.|\-*\.))+[a-z]{2,6}$
  • Email address: \b\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\b[A-z0-9_.%+-]+@[A-z0-9_.%+-]+\.[A-z]{2,4}
  • US phone: \W?\d{3}\W?\d{3}\W?\d{4}
  • US Phone number: ^\+?[\d\s]{3,}$
  • US Phone with code: ^\+?[\d\s]+\(?[\d\s]{10,}$
  • URL: \W?\d{3}\W?\d{3}\W?\d{4}\b\w+://(\w|-|\.|/)+(/|\b)
  • US Social Security Number (SSN): \d{3}-\d{2}-\d{4}
  • US ZIP: \d{5}(-\d{4})?
  • IP (v4) address: \b\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\b
  • IP (v4) address: \b(?:(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.){3}(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\b
  • IP (v4) address: ^(\d|[1-9]\d|1\d\d|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])\.(\d|[1-9]\d|1\d\d|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5]){3}$
  • IP (v4) address: \b(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\b
  • IP (v4) address: \b(?:(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.){3}(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\b
  • IP (v6) address:
  • MAC address: ^([0-9a-fA-F][0-9a-fA-F]:){5}([0-9a-fA-F][0-9a-fA-F])$
  • Positive Integers: ^\d+$
  • Negative Integers: ^-\d+$
  • Integer: ^-{0,1}\d+$
  • Positive Number: ^\d*\.{0,1}\d+$
  • Negative Number: ^-\d*\.{0,1}\d+$
  • Positive Number or Negative Number: ^-{0,1}\d*\.{0,1}\d+$
  • Floating point number: [-+]?([0-9]*\.[0-9]+|[0-9]+)
  • Floating point number: [-+]?(?:\b[0-9]+(?:\.[0-9]*)?|\.[0-9]+\b)(?:[eE][-+]?[0-9]+\b)?
  • Roman number: ^(?i:(?=[MDCLXVI])((M{0,3})((C[DM])|(D?C{0,3}))?((X[LC])|(L?XX{0,2})|L)?((I[VX])|(V?(II{0,2}))|V)?))$
  • Domain Name: ^([a-zA-Z0-9]([a-zA-Z0-9\-]{0,61}[a-zA-Z0-9])?\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,6}$
  • Domain Name: ^([a-z][a-z0-9\-]+(\.|\-*\.))+[a-z]{2,6}$
  • Windows File Name: (?i)^(?!^(PRN|AUX|CLOCK\$|NUL|CON|COM\d|LPT\d|\..*)(\..+)?$)[^\\\./:\*\?\”\|][^\\/:\*\?\”\|]{0,254}$
  • Date in format yyyy-MM-dd: (19|20)\d\d([- /.])(0[1-9]|1[012])\2(0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])
  • Date (dd mm yyyy, d/m/yyyy, etc.): ^([1-9]|0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])\D([1-9]|0[1-9]|1[012])\D(19[0-9][0-9]|20[0-9][0-9])$
  • Year 1900-2099: ^(19|20)[\d]{2,2}$

Related (here at this blog):
Command line based text replace – https://eikonal.wordpress.com/2010/07/13/command-line-based-text-replace/ |
Perl online – https://eikonal.wordpress.com/2010/02/15/perl-online/

2010.02.15

Perl online

Hashes

Files

Chomp()

Control structures

Tidbits

Rename files

Alex Batko says (at http://www.cs.mcgill.ca/~abatko/computers/programming/perl/):

Here is a brilliant program for renaming one or more files according to a specified Perl expression. I found it on page 706 of Programming Perl (3rd edition).

#!/usr/bin/perl
$op = shift;
for( @ARGV ) {
    $was = $_;
    eval $op;
    die if $@;
    rename( $was, $_ ) unless $was eq $_;
}

In the code above, the second last line calls the built-in function “rename”, not the program itself (which is named “rename.pl”). Below are a few examples of use.

% rename.pl 's/\.htm/\.html/' *.htm         # append an 'l'
% rename.pl '$_ .= ".old"' *.html           # append '.old'
% rename.pl 'tr/A-Z/a-z/' *.HTML            # lowercase
% rename.pl 'y/A-Z/a-z/ unless /^Make/' *   # lowercase

Printing hashes

Starting with an input file with data in two columns separated by coma (,):

#/bin/perl -t

my %TempHash = ();
my $InputFile = shift;
print "Input file = ",$InputFile,"\n";

my ($line,$column1,$column2,);

#reading input file to generate hash
open (INPUTSTREAM, '<',  $InputFile) || die ("Could not open $InputFile");
while ( $line =  ) {
	chomp;
        #print $line;
	($column1, $column2) = split ',', $line;
        $TempHash{$column1}=$column2;
        #print $column1," ==> ",$TempHash{$column1};
}
close (INPUTSTREAM);

## printing hash - way #1
print "The following are in the DB: ",join(', ',values %TempHash),"\n";

## printing hash - way #2
while (($key, $value) = each %TempHash)
{
     print "$key ==> $value";
}

## printing hash - way #3
foreach $key (sort keys %TempHash){
   print "$key ==> $TempHash{$key}";
}

Removing white spaces

Sources:

# Declare the subroutines
sub trim($);
sub ltrim($);
sub rtrim($);

# Perl trim function to remove whitespace from the start and end of the string
sub trim($)
{
	my $string = shift;
	$string =~ s/^\s+//;
	$string =~ s/\s+$//;
	return $string;
}
# Left trim function to remove leading whitespace
sub ltrim($)
{
	my $string = shift;
	$string =~ s/^\s+//;
	return $string;
}
# Right trim function to remove trailing whitespace
sub rtrim($)
{
	my $string = shift;
	$string =~ s/\s+$//;
	return $string;
}

# Here is how to output the trimmed text "Hello world!"
print trim($string)."\n";
print ltrim($string)."\n";
print rtrim($string)."\n";


Related: Regular Expressions – https://eikonal.wordpress.com/2010/04/02/regular-expressions/ | Command line based text replace – https://eikonal.wordpress.com/2010/07/13/command-line-based-text-replace/

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